Interview do's and don'ts

Great news: after all those job applications, you’ve actually made it to the interview stage! In this competitive job market, you need to stand out and though your CV has already made a good impression, you need to follow this through at the interview. I’ve had to interview for a few roles over the years and I’ve been amazed at, despite having impressive CVs, how many simple mistakes candidates make during the interview.

Yes, we all want astonish our future employers with our brilliance and expertise, but if we turn up late or don’t look the part, then there’s a strong chance the interview is blown! So to help all you future interviewees out there, I thought I’d put together a list of dos and don’ts to ensure you at least have a chance of getting your dream job!

1. Don’t stretch the truth.

First and foremost, lying on your CV is not a good idea. Remember, you will have to talk through everything you have written, in detail, so there’s a strong chance you will get caught out. While we’re on the subject of CVs, don’t exaggerate in a bid to look perfect. I remember reading a candidate’s CV once, and they appeared to be more angelic than Mother Theresa herself, undertaking various voluntary roles as well as caring for sick relatives—even their dog gave blood! I began to worry that they never had any time left to work!

2. Do your homework.

One of the first questions often asked at interview is, “What do you know about our company?” so make sure you can talk confidently about their services. I remember interviewing someone once, and when faced with this question, they went totally blank. They muttered the words that were written under the logo which was on the wall behind my head, but couldn’t elaborate on anything after that.

I knew it was just nerves, but it was uncomfortable to watch, and the tumbleweed silence that ensued was only broken by their heavy breathing. So make sure you read as much as you can about the company and if you are prone to nerve-driven mind-blank moments, make some notes and have them in front of you as a prompt. OK, it’s not ideal, but it’s better than saying you don’t know!

Businesswoman and entrepreneur, Karen James of Lilac James has years of interviewing experience:

“Every interviewer will have their own quirks, likes and dislikes, these are impossible to determine so making sure all your bases are covered will ensure you given the best impression of yourself. It’s simple really. I personally like to be sure people know about my business and ask questions about the role. Asking about money and benefits before an offer is on the table is not a good idea and don’t be rude about past employers. Even if you feel you are being led in this direction, the interviewer may be testing your reaction so be professional at all times.”

3. Yes, appearance does matter.

Well, this may sound like an obvious thing to say, but appearance is so important. You are expected to show your best self in every way at the interview, so if you turn up looking scruffy, dirty or dressed like you’re going to a club, interviewers will presume that if this best you can do, it can only get worse from here!

Do your research and just pitch it right. If you’re interviewing for a job in fashion, then wear trendy clothing; if you want to be a city banker, invest in a suit (watch the Wall Street movies for guidance!). It’s not just your clothes though—it’s your appearance in general.

I know a manager who is put off by people wearing too much perfume or aftershave or smelling of smoke (take heed smokers), and if you have dirty or chipped nails, well, you have no chance! To an interviewer, looking like you care reflects how you will apply yourself in your future role.

4. Keep focused.

You must try to keep focused and answer questions clearly and concisely. Using and taking notes in an interview is acceptable and preparing questions to ask in advance will look like you’ve done your research and thought carefully about the role.

Don’t ramble and don’t over-talk. Remember, you need to give your interviewer the opportunity to ask some questions. Just bear in mind, an interview is a dialogue not a monologue; there’s a fine line between confidence and coming across as cocky. Listen to what the interviewer is saying and don’t let your mind drift through nerves. The interviewer will know when your eyes glaze over and you’re no longer in the room, so to speak. Therefore, if it takes a double espresso to keep you alert in the interview, then my advice is: do it!

5. A hug is way too far!

OK, this is easy: don’t hug you’re interviewer when you leave! Everyone loves a hug, but this is a step too far at an interview, even if you feel like it went well. Remember, your interviewer is not your new BFF. A firm handshake will suffice.

When asked about your life don’t, whatever you do, reveal your innermost secrets. They don’t need to know that your partner had an affair or that you have a reoccurring nail fungus. The interviewer just wants to wrap up the interview with an idea of who you are out of work. They want to hear about your hobbies and interests, so appear interesting and bear in mind, this is a job interview not a counselling session!

I know these tips can’t guarantee you will get the job but at least they will help the interviewer remember you for your skills and knowledge instead of the tale you told about your fling with your old boss. After all, it’s not much to ask to turn up on time, look presentable, show knowledge and interest in the role and appear confident and positive about the opportunity of an interview with the company you really want to work with. It’s not rocket science, so what are you waiting for? Pop a mint in your mouth and go get that job!

Featured photo credit: Dollar Photo Club via dollarphotoclub.com

The post Do’s and Don’ts for Interview Success appeared first on Lifehack.

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